Friday, September 5, 2014

School Visits and Lessons For the Classroom

Patient for Pumpkins is the perfect fall picture book to share and learn with. I'd love to visit classrooms to share my book, make art, write stories or whatever you might have in mind. One of the best ways to experience the book, is to take a field trip to the farmer's market!

Lesson Ideas related to the following standards can be done before or after a field trip to the farmer's market, or you can bring farm produce to your classroom!

Kindergarten CC Language Arts

RL.K. 1 - With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

RL.K. 3 - With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.

RI.K. 10 - Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding.

Activity: Read a “Patient for Pumpkins” prior to a visit to the farmer’s market and have students retell events, answer questions, and identify major events in the story. This can be done verbally or students could draw a picture or create a storyboard.

Kindergarten CC Math

(2) Students describe their physical world using geometric ideas (e.g., shape, orientation, spatial relations) and vocabulary. They identify, name, and describe basic two-dimensional shapes, such as squares, triangles, circles, rectangles, and hexagons, presented in a variety of ways (e.g., with different sizes and orientations), as well as three-dimensional shapes such as cubes, cones, cylinders, and spheres. They use basic shapes and spatial reasoning to model objects in their environment and to construct more complex shapes.

Kindergarten Science
Investigation and Experimentation 
  1. Scientific progress is made by asking meaningful questions and conducting careful investigations. As a basis for understanding this concept and addressing the content in the other three strands, students should develop their own questions and perform investigations. Students will: 
    1. Observe common objects by using the five senses. 
    2. Describe the properties of common objects. 
    3. Describe the relative position of objects by using one reference (e.g., above or below). 
    4. Compare and sort common objects by one physical attribute (e.g., color, shape, texture, size, weight). 
    5. Communicate observations orally and through drawings.

Notes: At the farmer’s market, students will have the opportunity to observe fruits and vegetables of many different sizes, shapes, textures, and colors. Students will be able to see, smell and touch a variety of produce. Use the list of produce in the back of the book to help students look for a variety of produce.

Activity: Paint or draw a fruit and vegetable still life composition. Have students describe the shapes, colors and textures of the produce, and its position in relation to other objects. See attached lesson plan.

First Grade CC Language Arts 
RL.1. 3 - Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.
  
W.1. 8 - With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.

SL.1.3 - Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to gather additional information or clarify something that is not understood.

Activity: Read “Patient for Pumpkins” prior to the visit and have students describe the characters, settings, and major events of the story using details. This can be done verbally or students can draw a picture or create a storyboard. Provide students with questions to ask the farmers at the market. Have students share questions/answers upon returning to school. Use the list of produce at the back of the book to help students formulate questions about different foods to look for at the market.

First Grade CC Math 
(4) Students compose and decompose plane or solid figures (e.g., put two triangles together to make a quadrilateral) and build understanding of part-whole relationships as well as the properties of the original and composite shapes. As they combine shapes, they recognize them from different perspectives and orientations, describe their geometric attributes, and determine how they are alike and different, to develop the background for measurement and for initial understandings of properties such as congruence and symmetry. 

First Grade Science
Investigation and Experimentation 
  1. Scientific progress is made by asking meaningful questions and conducting careful investigations. As a basis for understanding this concept and addressing the content in the other three strands, students should develop their own questions and perform investigations. Students will: 
    1. Draw pictures that portray some features of the thing being described. 
    2. Record observations and data with pictures, numbers, or written statements. 
    3. Record observations on a bar graph. 
    4. Describe the relative position of objects by using two references (e.g., above and next to, below and left of). 
Notes: At the farmer’s market, students will have the opportunity to observe fruits and vegetables of many different sizes, shapes, textures, and colors. Students will be able to see, smell and touch a variety of produce. Use the list in the back of the book to help students look for a variety of produce.

Activity: Paint or draw a fruit and vegetable still life composition. Have students describe the shapes, colors and textures of the produce, and its position in relation to other objects. See attached lesson plan. Extend the project by writing observations and collecting data about the produce.

Second Grade Language Arts

RL.2.1 - Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.

W.2.2 - Write informative/explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a concluding statement or section.

W.2.8 - Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.

SL.2.3 - Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to clarify comprehension, gather additional information, or deepen understanding of a topic or issue.

Activity: Read “Patient for Pumpkins” prior to the visit and have students create a diagram in Kidspiration telling the who, what, where, when, why and how of the story. Provide students with questions to ask the farmers at the market. Have students share questions/answers upon returning to school. Use the list of produce at the back of the book to help students formulate questions about different foods to look for at the market. After visiting the market, have students write an informative piece related to their visit and the information they learned about different fruits or vegetables.

Second Grade CC Math
(4) Students describe and analyze shapes by examining their sides and angles. Students investigate, describe, and reason about decomposing and combining shapes to make other shapes. Through building, drawing, and analyzing two- and three-dimensional shapes, students develop a foundation for understanding area, volume, congruence, similarity, and symmetry in later grades.

Second Grade Science
Investigation and Experimentation
  1. Scientific progress is made by asking meaningful questions and conducting careful investigations. As a basis for understanding this concept and addressing the content in the other three strands, students should develop their own questions and perform investigations. Students will: 
    1. Make predictions based on observed patterns and not random guessing. 
    2. Measure length, weight, temperature, and liquid volume with appropriate tools and express those measurements in standard metric system units. 
    3. Compare and sort common objects according to two or more physical attributes (e. g., color, shape, texture, size, weight). 
    4. Write or draw descriptions of a sequence of steps, events, and observations. 
    5. Construct bar graphs to record data, using appropriately labeled axes. 
    6. Use magnifiers or microscopes to observe and draw descriptions of small objects or small features of objects. 
    7. Follow oral instructions for a scientific investigation.

Activity: Using close observation with magnifiers or microscopes, draw or paint observations of one of the fruits or vegetables from the farmer’s market. Students should notice patterns, textures, colors and details. Make sure students fill the paper with a large illustration of their close-up observations. Extend this activity by having students compare their observations of one type of produce with another. For example, find the differences and similarities of a peach and a nectarine, or a strawberry and a blackberry. Students might compare number and size of seeds, overall size, shapes, texture, color, weight, symmetrical features.

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